MHA of Rockland Announces Lana Rumore, LMHC, as New Director of Adult Rehabilitative Services

Valley Cottage, NY – July 10, 2019 – The Mental Health Association of Rockland (MHA of Rockland) proudly announces the promotion of Lana Rumore to Director of Adult Rehabilitative Services to lead MHA of Rockland’s Personalized Recovery-Oriented Services (PROS) initiative. In this role, Ms. Rumore will restructure the PROS program by expanding the range of classes, focus on meeting individuals where they currently are and assisting them in obtaining both short term and long-term goals. Ms. Rumore will also lead a renewed focus on education and employment.

PROS was established in 2011 with the purpose of fostering healing and growth through an offering of classes and individual support to adults with complex mental health issues. Its team includes clinicians, group counselors, nurses and psychiatrists. PROS is licensed by the New York State Office of Mental Health. In 2018, MHA Rockland provided services to more than 5,500 county residents.

Since joining MHA of Rockland in 2012, Ms. Rumore has managed various departments, most recently holding the position of Director of Adult Care Management, where she was responsible for overseeing the department which helps connect members with chronic health conditions to various resources in the community in order to foster wellness and independence. Ms. Rumore has also acted as Director of Vocational Services within the agency since 2014 and will continue to promote wellness for children, adolescents and adults in the community by assisting them with vocational opportunities. She holds a Masters of Science in Mental Health Counseling from Pace University and is a certified trainer in Health Literacy and Mental Health First Aid. A Hudson Valley resident, Ms. Rumore is passionate about working within the community and currently oversees the Work Readiness Internship Development Experience (WRIDE) for high school students in the East Ramapo and Spring Valley School Districts. Through WRIDE, students participate in work readiness classes and then seek/obtain paid internships in order to journey in employment.

About the Mental Health Association of Rockland

The Mental Health Association of Rockland helps people living with mental illness and/or addiction to embrace life and redefine themselves. MHA of Rockland also welcomes and supports families, friends, employers and colleagues who care about those struggling with these challenges. Since opening their doors in 1951, MHA of Rockland has touched the lives of more than 50,000 Rockland County residents.

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Organizations interested in offering customized MHA of Rockland presentations to their staff on recognizing signs and symptoms of mental health conditions, promoting individual wellness, creating a positive workplace culture, and connecting to resources in the community should contact Velvet Reda, Development Director, at (845) 216-4045, redav@mharockland.org.

MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION OF ROCKLAND AND GENOA HEALTHCARE OPEN NEW INTEGRATED PHARMACY

MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION OF ROCKLAND AND GENOA HEALTHCARE OPEN NEW INTEGRATED PHARMACY

• Genoa Healthcare will provide full on-site pharmacy services and an integrated care team approach within the Mental Health Association of Rockland in Valley Cottage, NY
• MHA of Rockland CEO Stephanie Madison will speak about how the integrated pharmacy model improves medication adherence and healthcare outcomes for clients with behavioral health conditions

WHAT: State legislative leaders will join MHA of Rockland and Genoa Healthcare leaders for the grand
opening of a new on-site pharmacy. Clients receiving pharmacy services in the same facility as their care can more easily obtain medications, leading to improved medication adherence and lower rates of hospitalization and emergency care. Genoa Healthcare is the leading provider of pharmacy, telepsychiatry and medication management services for individuals with behavioral health conditions.

The grand opening, which coincides with Mental Health Awareness Month, will include a ribbon cutting and remarks from MHA of Rockland and Genoa Healthcare leaders. Lunch will be available immediately following.

WHO: Stephanie Madison, CEO and President, MHA of Rockland
Suzanne Tamer, Director of Operations, Genoa Healthcare
Iman Badawy, Pharmacy Site Manager
David Carlucci, New York State Senator, Chairman of Committee on Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities
Ellen Jaffee, New York State Assembly Member
Kenneth Zebrowski, New York State Assembly Member
Ed Day, County Executive

WHEN: Thursday, May 16, 2019
Noon – Ribbon-cutting and remarks

WHERE: Mental Health Association of Rockland
140 Route 303, Suite H
Valley Cottage, NY 10989

About Mental Health Association of Rockland
The Mental Health Association of Rockland has a 68 year history of providing outstanding services to more than 50,000 Rockland residents since their inception in 1951. They have grown from a grassroots organization, to the premier provider of behavioral health services in the community, engaging more than 5,000 individuals annually. MHA of Rockland consistently strives to improve the quality of life for those affected by mental health and/or substance use issues. They offer a vast array of therapeutic services, with most programs offered in people’s homes, schools, and workplaces. At their location in Valley Cottage, and in the community based sites, they work tirelessly to connect people, educate families, and rebuild lives.
About Genoa Healthcare
Genoa Healthcare has been serving the behavioral health community for nearly 20 years, providing pharmacy services, telepsychiatry and medication management solutions. Today, Genoa Healthcare serves 800,000 individuals annually in 47 states and the District of Columbia, and fills more than 15 million prescriptions per year. Genoa Healthcare has more than 450 pharmacies located onsite within community mental health centers. Genoa Healthcare is part of OptumRx, a leading pharmacy care services company.
Media Contact:

MHA of Rockland
Velvet Reda
Phone: 845-267-2172 Ext. 257 | redav@mharockland.org

Mindfulness in the Age of Anxiety

By Lynda Guzman, Director of ACT

 

Mindfulness and Anxiety are two ever-present buzz words in today’s media (both social and formal) which mirrors professional discussions concerning the harmful effects of anxiety and stress on the body and mind. Webster’s Dictionary defines anxiety as “an abnormal and overwhelming sense of apprehension and fear often marked by physical signs (such as tension, sweating, and increased pulse rate), by doubt concerning the reality and nature of the threat, and by self-doubt about one’s capacity to cope with it” Clearly this describes many of the issues that have caused angst for people today.  The best remedy available (without prescriptions) is the practice of mindfulness.

 

Mindfulness has been defined as “an act of consciously focusing the mind in the present moment without judgement and without attachment to the moment.” (Linehan 2015) It seems so simple but is excruciatingly difficult in this age of heightened stress.  Many people are struggling with how to control their anxiety and how to live their best possible life.  The answer can be found in creating a meaningful mindfulness practice that honors the best of today while honing the skills that one might need for tomorrow.

Meditation is a form of mindfulness where the practitioner focuses on one thing (Beit their breath, a focal point outside of themselves, or some type of counting exercise) for a specific time period which allows the person to connect with that moment.  This type of activity is considered a grounding exercise and can be used in times of high stress as well as part of a daily ritual.  Meditation can also be used to focus one’s energy in the sense of an internal monologue about an aspect of one’s life such as “I will think through all the options before making a decision about my next vacation.”

 

Mindfulness can also be the totality of one’s senses in any given moment.  An example of this can be found in weight loss programs where the program will encourage the participant to use all their senses while eating. “I see a lush red strawberry with small seeds dotting the outside.  The strawberry feels bumpy as I hold it in my hand.  There is a slightly sweet earthy aroma. I hear the gentle smack of my lips as I bite into the strawberry.  I taste the sweetness which fills my mouth.”  This is the total berry experience.  Obviously, this can be done at any moment and in any set of circumstances.  Occasionally, when someone has difficulty with panic or high levels of anxiety, a mental health professional will suggest a naming exercise where the person will name all of the blue things in their environment or all the things that begin with the letter T.